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COMPUTER 




PLAYING INSTRUCTIONS 




THE RELENTLESS 

OPPONENT 

YOU CAN TAKE 

ANYWHERE ! 



V. 



■MATTEL SLiECTRDniCS" 



PRINTED IN HONG KONG. ■"■ : > :■ ■ 



A. HOW TO INSTALL THE BATTERY 



Turn the game upside 
down. Slide battery 
compartment cover off 
and install one9-volt 
alkaline battery, then 
replace cover. 




TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page No. 

A. How To Install The Battery Above 

B. The Keyboard 1 

C. The Backgammon Board 2 

D. Backgammon: You vs. The Computer 3 

1. Set The Skill Level 3 

2. Roll The Dice 3 

3. You Can Determine The Dice Values 3 

4. Use The Cursor To Move Your Men 4 

5. Using The Doubling Cube 5 

6. If The Computer Doubles You 6 

7. When You're Hit . . .6 

8. Computer Decision Time 6 

9. Stacked Men 7 

10. Bearing Off 7 

11. Sound Effects 7 

E. The Basics Of Backgammon 9 

F. Strategy Tips 16 

G. Probabilities & Possibilities 18 

H. Glossary Of Backgammon Terms 21 

I. Suggested Backgammon Reading 23 

J. Warranty Information 24 



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BACKGAMMON BOARD 



/ 

ON/OFF SWITCH 



KEYBOARD 



B. THE KEYBOARD 



CUBE -Press to 
disengage Cube 
option (no sound); 
press again to 
activate Cube (short 
beep). Use only at 
start of game 



PASS- 
Indicates that 
you refuse 
computer's 
double and 
concede the 
game. 



DBL- When Cube 
option is used and 
marker is shown, 
doubles score value 
of game if the 
computer accepts. 
You must press 
before you roll 




CLEAR 
Corrects input 
errors before you 
press IMOVEI . 



MOVE - Locks in 
player's move and 
initiates the 
computer's dice roll 
and move. 




DICE -Inputs \ 
dice you specify, 
for yourself or 
computer. 



CSR- Moves 
cursor to the 
point you want 
to m ove fr om. 
Left fCSRl 
moves 

counterclock- 
wise around the 
board; Right 
ICSRl Moves 
clockwise. 



NUMBERS- 
indicates number of 
points you want to 
move your man 
- Indicates die spots 
after yo u press 

TjTceI 

■ Indicates game 
eve I after you 
press |LEVEL| 



LEVEL -Sets game 
evel (1 to 6; level 6 
s highest skill). 



C. THE BACKGAMMON BOARD 



POINTER INDICATING 
YOUR MEN (where flashing, 
indicates cursor position) 



DOUBLING 
CUBE WINDOWS 




MARKER INDICATES 
THAT YOU CONTROL 
DOUBLING CUBE 



YOUR INNER BOARD 



NOTE: THIS FIRST PART OF THE 
INSTRUCTIONS IS FOR THOSE WHO 
ALREADY KNOW HOW TO PLAY 
BACKGAMMON. IF YOU HAVE NEVER 
PLAYED OR WANT TO BRUSH UP ON THE 
RULES OF THE GAME, REFER TO PAGE 9. 



D. BACKGAMMON: 

YOU VS. THE COMPUTER 

After you've installed the battery, slide ON /OFF 
switch to the left. The board will appear in game 
start position, as illustrated. 



1. SET THE SKILL LEVEL. Press ILEVEL | , then a 
number key (Level 1 is easiest; 6 is the most 
challenging). You hear a short buzz. If you don't 
select a level, the computer will automatically 
play at Level 1. 



ROLL THE DICE. Press I ROLL I , and the 
computer will generate a random electronic dice 
roll. You hear a "roll" sound while the dice 
spots are changing. If the first roll of the g ame 



produces doubles, you must press [ROLL] again, 



since the first turn is decided by whether you or 
the computer have the higher die. The top die is 
the computer's, for this purpose. 

YOU CAN, IF YOU WISH, DETERMINE THE 
DICE VALUES. Any time during the gam e you 



can input dice values by pressing |DICE[ , then 
the two number keys for the spots you select. If 
you do this for the opening roll of the game, the 
top die is the computer's, and if you make it the 
higher value, the computer will move as soon as 
you enter the second die. If you make your own 
die have the higher value, you can change the 
dice any time until you actually make yo ur move . 



To set the computer's dice values, press [DICE 



and the desired numbers at the completion of 
your turn. 



If you are playing with the Cube option, the 
computer makes its doubling decision after you 
set its dice values (when the dice are randomly 
thrown, the computer decides before roll). The 
computer does not use your non-random dice in 
making its doubling decision. After the 
computer has made its decision, it will "roll" 
the dice, but they will stop on the numbers you 
selected. Then the computer will make its moves. 

4. USE THE CURSOR TO MOVE YOUR MEN. 
The blinking pointer shows you where the 
cursor is. When you press a number key 
corresponding to an unused die value, one of 
your men will move from that point. The cursor 
is always at your backmost point when your turn 
begin s. To move the cursor clockwise, press the 
right [CSR I . T o move counterclock wise, p ress 



the left ICSRl . Each time you press [CSR] , the 



cursor will jump to the next point where one or 
more of your men are located (indicated by the 
pointer). 

When the cursor is located at the point you want 
to move from, press a number key equal to an 
unused die value. If the move is legal, you hear 
a double signal. The man being moved will flash. 
Then the man will be moved. If the move is not 
legal, you hear a "buzz". Then the cursor goes 
back to your backmost position if you have 
another possible move. (With double dice, 
you'll have 3 more moves). 

When you hav e used both your dice (if possible), 
press [MOVE). If y ou change your mind before 
you press | MOVE J , you can reset your men with 
[CLEAR I. 



V. 



NOTE: According to the rules of backgammon, if 
there is any way you can use both dice values, 
you must do so. The computer will let you make 
a move which would prevent your using the 
second die value because of the board situation. 
It is up to you to be sure that you use both dice if 
you can. 

5.USING THE DOUBLING CUBE. Each basic 
game of Backgammon has a score value of one 
point. However, the score value can be 
increased when the Doubling Cube is brought 
into play. With the Cube, it's possible to raise 
the score value of the game to 2, 4, 8, 16, 32 or 
64 points! If you have the advantage in the 
game, you can use this doubling option. 
The Cube option is autom atically O N at game 
start. To disengage, press [CUBE| before your 
first play. You can double before you roll your dice 
if there hasn't already been a double or if the cube 
control pointer is visible. 

To double the value of your game against the 



computer, just press | DBL| . The cube's value 



now appears in one of the windows to the left of 
the board. If the computer accepts your double, 
the control pointer disappears (meaning that 
the computer controls the cube for the next 
double) and you can go ahead with your roll. 

If the computer declines to accept your double, 
you'll hear the 6-note "victory tune", indicating 
that you have won the game. 

If the cube has been doubled alternately by you 
and the computer (so that it stands at 4), and 
you then offer to double again and the computer 
refuses, the game you win is worth 4 points. 



6. 1 F THE COMPUTER DOUBLES YOU . : . there 
may be a short pause after you 've pressed 



MOVE | at the end of your turn, while the 
computer evaluates the playing situation. The 
dice will not roll until it has made its decision. If 
the computer wants to double, the cube pointer 
will flash and you'll hear a continuous "beep 
beep" . If you want to accept the double, press 
1 DBL | . The cube pointer stops flashing, the 
beeping stops, the cube pointer turns on to 
show that you have cube control, and the dice 
begin to roll. I f you do not wish to accept the 
double, press [PASS] . You lose the game, of 
course, and whatever points are currently 
shown in the cube windows. 

7. WHEN YOU'RE HIT. When any man is hit, it is 
first removed to the bar, then the attacking man 
moves to its vacated point. When you have a 
man on the bar you must play that man before 
any others. There will not be a cursor indicator 
in that situation, since re-entering your man 
from the bar first is your only legal move. 

8. COMPUTER DECISION TIME. As you would 
expect, the computer plays faster at the lower 
levels, and slightly faster at all levels when the 
doubling cube is not activated. Generally 
double dice require more time for the computer, 
particularly 1 's, 2's and 3's. The computer's 
slowest response will be in situations when it 
has rolled double dice and a hit is possible, and 
for any move when you have a man on the bar. 
The average response time at level 1 is 1 5 to 20 
seconds; at level 6, 35-40 seconds. The 
maximum time the computer will take is about 
2 1 /2 minutes, but this occurs infrequently. 



V. 



9. STACKED MEN. When either you or the 
computer have more than 5 men on a point, the 
LCD display will indicate the number like this: 



□ H H H H H 

□ □ □ E 

□ □ □ DDE 

□ □□□ DDES 

bshheedees 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 
(the starred men will be seen as flashing) 



10. BEARING OFF. When bearing off your men, 
use the same method as for your moves in the 
earlier stage of the game: press a number key 



for each die value and then press I MOVE 
Those men will disappear. 

11- SOUND EFFECTS. The computer generates 
several sounds, as follows: 




DICE ROLL 
tones. 



Single tone, followed by 3 ascending 



A MAN HIT — A short tone, followed by 4 
ascending tones. 




BUZZ — Heard when you attempt an illegal move, or 
when the computer has rolled dice but cannot 
take any moves, or when the first roll comes up 
doubles. 

BEEP — Heard when cube option is activated. 

BEEP BEEP — Heard when computer has doubled 
and is waiting for you to accept (with 1 DBL | ) or 
concede the game (with | PASS I ). 

6 TONE VICTORY TUNE - Heard when you win. 

2 LONG BUZZES — Heard when the computer wins. 

GAMMON — Victory tune or buzz plays 2 times. 

BACKGAMMON — Victory tune or buzz plays 3 
times. 



E. THE BASICS OF BACKGAMMON 

THE OBJECT OF THE GAME is to be the first to 
move your 15 pieces (called "men") around and 
finally off the board. Moving your men off the board 
is called "bearing off". The first player to remove all 
his men is the winner. This movement of men is done 
according to rolls of dice, and each spot on the dice 
allows movement to one "point" (the 24 triangular 
locations). 

The game board is divided into four quarters. As you 
look at the game the upper left quarter is your 
opponent's "home (or inner) board". The lower left 
quarter is your "home (or inner) board". The 
quarters on the right side of the game are your 
"outer" boards. The home and outer boards are 
separated by a bar. 



OPPONENTS HOME 
(INNER BOARD 



BAR 



OPPONENT'S 
OUTER BOARD 




YOUR HOME 
(INNER BOARD) 



YOUR OUTER 
BOARD 



DIRECTION 
YOU MOVE 

-« M — 



*"» 



— -*- 



DIRECTION 
OPPONENT MOVES 
-► ► 



J 



\- 



At the start of the game, the men are arranged as 
shown. In this illustration, your men are indicated by 
LCD markers at points 24, 13, 8 and 6. Your 
opponent — the computer — starts with men at 
opposite points. 

Your men are moved according to the numbers on 
the dice. These numbers are to be counted 
separately, not as a total. The dice numbers can both 
be used to move one man, or each die can determine 
the movement of different men. A roll of 6 and 4 is 
considered a 6-and-4 move (or a 4-and-6 move), but 
not a 10 move. In every case though, a move can 
never take your man to a point where 2 or more of 
your opponent's men are. 

Let's assume that you have won the first roll of the 
dice by having a 6, and your opponent has gotten a 4. 
You could move one man from Point 24 to Point 18 
(using the 6), then move that same man from Point 
18 to Point 14 (using the 4). 




ON GAMES 
FIRST ROLL 



COMPUTER'S 
DIE 



YOUR DIE 



Point 19 is blocked, because your opponent has more 
than one man there, so you could not have used a 5-5 
roll to move from Point 24 to Point 14, since part of 
the move would have been to 19. 



Or you could use the same roll to move two men, 
like this: 




... or you could make other combinations of moves 
on that dice roll. 

Let's assume that our move was the one in the 
second illustration. Your men at 24, 18 and 9 are 
each single occupants of a point. They are called 
"blots". If the computer, whose turn it now is, gets 
any combination of dice that takes one of its men to 
any of those points, your man will be "hit" — 
removed from the board and placed on the bar in the 




YOUR 
MAN 
■ GOES TO 
THE BAR 



• ^H 



middle of the playing board. Suppose your 
opponent's next roll is a 6-1 . This is how such a roll 
would be played: 

Your opponent kills two birds with one stone with 
such a move, by hitting your blot and by occupying 
another point, closing it to you. Your man on the bar 
must be played before you can make any other move, 
and it must re-enter in your opponent's home board. 
In this case, it will take a die value of 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5 to 
reenter your man, because the 6th point in your 
opponent's home board is closed. For purposes of 
re-entering, points in both home boards are 
numbered from left to right, 1 through 6. 

All these principles apply both ways, of course. If 
you hit any blot of your opponent during the game, 
that man will also be sent to the bar, and must 
reenter in your home board. 

In a sense, the game of Backgammon is like a race, 
and during the play of the game you should protect 
yourself by leaving the fewest possible blots, and 
occupy the most possible points to present obstacles 
to your opponent's progress. 

If double dice are rolled, the player moves twice for 
each die (i.e., if the roll is 4-4, a total of 16 points can 
be moved, in increments of four). Again, the roll can 
be split, with one man moving four points and the 
other 1 2 points (never landing on a closed point) or 
two men can be advanced in two 4-point moves — so 
long as the combination always takes them to open 
points. If doubles come up on the game's first roll, 
the dice must be rolled again, to determine who has 
the opening turn. 



V. 



You must always take a move if you possibly can, 
even if it is to your disadvantage to do so. Here's an 
example of a roll in the later stages of a game that 
you'd rather not have; nonetheless, you must move 
both values, leaving yourself with at least one blot 
when your opponent's inner board is almost closed; 
if you get hit it is very likely that you will lose the 
game. 



It's your 
turn . . . 




When all your men are in your home board you can 
start to "bear off" — remove them from the board. 
Remember, this is the final step in winning, because 
the object of the game is to bear off all your men 
sooner than your opponent bears off his. 

When bearing off, you can remove a man from a 
point which corresponds to each number thrown, or 
when a die number is higher than the highest point 
you occupy. For example, here is a bearing off 
situation in which you have rolled a 6-2. You can use 
the 6 to remove your man on the 5-point. However, 
since you have no men on the 2-point you must move 
one of your men down from the 3 or 4-point. 



V. 



You cannot bear off a man on the 1-point yet because 
you still have men on points that are higher than the 
unused die. 



Your turn 




Sometimes after you have started to bear off your 
men you will be hit. You cannot continue to bear off 
until all your men are back inside your inner board! 

An optional feature, the Doubling Cube, adds a 
whole new dimension to the game. The Doubling 
Cube allows either player to double the point value of 
the game in progress. It is somewhat like a raise in 
the game of poker, when one player, who believes he 
is likely to win the hand, can raise the stakes. His 
opponents must either meet the raise or concede the 
hand. 

Each Backgammon game has the basic score value of 
1 point. At the start of the game, either player has 
the right, before taking his turn, to double the score 
value (see #5, on page 5). The other player either 
accepts the double or concedes the game. Control of 
the Cube alternates between the players. In 
Computer Backgammon, the LCD marker shows you 
when you have control of the Cube. 



• • 




The windows above the marker 
show the current point value of the 
game (all are shown here, but in 
real play there is never more than 
one value visible). If nothing is 
shown, the point value of the game 
is 1. 

When you think you have the 

advantage in a game and are likely to 

win, challenge your opponent by 

doubling. If you are just slightly 

ahead, behind or even, your double will probably be 

accepted. Then, if the tide turns and your opponent 

gains the lead, you may be re-doubled. In this way 

the score value of the game can advance to a high 

level. If either player refuses the challenge of a 

double, his opponent wins the game and the scoring 

value appearing in the Cube windows at the time. 

If a player can bear off all his men before his 
opponent has taken off any, that is a "gammon", 
and the value of the game is doubled. If the Doubling 
Cube were set at a value of 4, the victory would be 
worth 8 points. 

If a player can bear off all his men before his 
opponent has taken off any and while the opponent 
has any man in the winner's inner board or on the 
bar, that is a "backgammon", and the value of the 
game is tripled (again, triple the value of the 
Doubling Cube)! 



V. 



F. STRATEGY TIPS 

1. Play an aggressive "hitting" game. To win at 
Backgammon you almost always have to take 
chances and play an aggressive, "hitting" game. 
Most of the time, you will have choices about the 
moves you make, and it is nearly always wise to hit 
your opponent when you can, unless that move 
leaves you very exposed to being hit yourself. 

2. Put your men where they will do you the most 
good. Try to build strategically placed points that will 
hinder your opponent's progress as much as possible. 
Don't stack a lot of men on one point. Ideally, you 
should always control from 5 to 7 points. The key 
points you should try for are your bar point (#7) and 
your 5-point, as well as other points on your inner 
board. Defensively, if you have the opportunity, try 
to block your opponent's bar point and/or 5-point. 

3. When you leave a blot, consider the consequences. 

When you are forced to leave blots, try to leave them 
where it will require both of your opponent's dice to 
hit you. If that can't be done, leave your blot as close 
as possible to the attacking man (see the Probability 
Chart and study the frequencies of lower numbers). 
If you are not sure where to leave an exposed man, 
try to put it where it will do you the most good if your 
opponent fails to hit it. 

4. Keep your men in play. Don't move your men far 
into your inner board in the early stages of the game. 
When your men are on the 1 , 2 and 3-points, they are 
effectively "out of the play" and can't be used to 
block points that reduce your opponent's choice of 
moves — or to hit his blots and send his men to the 
bar. 



V> 



5. Be familiar with dice probabilities. Because you 
have to make a lot of decisions when you play 
Backgammon, you should be familiar with the 
probabilities of dice. You don't have to be a 
mathematician to be a consistent winner, but you'll 
do much better if your choices are based on knowing 
at lease the elementary odds shown in the tables on 
page 18. 

6. Having control of the Doubling Cube is important! 

When playing with the Doubling Cube, remember 
that there is an inherent value in controlling it. When 
you have this control from having accepted your 
opponent's double, be more conservative when 
thinking about re-doubling than if the Cube had not 
yet been used. 

Don 't double when you have a clearly strong 
opportunity to win a gammon, because that could let 
your opponent "off the hook" by resigning and 
avoiding the gammon premium. 

Always view each position independently from what 
happened before. Be objective, and never accept 
doubles to "get even"! 

If you estimate that you have a 25% chance or better 
to win the game, accept your opponent's double. If 
not, pass! 



V 



•*■■•• 



G. PROBABILITIES & POSSIBILITIES 

You do not have to be a mathematician to play 
Backgammon well. However, it will help you to be 
aware of how some numbers are more likely to occur 
than others. There are exactly 36 possible 
combinations of dice spots, but because double dice 
are playable two times each, the probabilities of 
rolled numbers are distributed this way: 



Spots 


No. of Ways 
Out of 36 


% of Occurance 
(Probability) 


1 


11 


30.6% 


2 


12 


33.3% 


3 


14 


38.9% 


4 


15 


41.7% 


5 


15 


41.7% 


6 


17 


47.2% 


7 


6 


16.7% 


8 


6 


16.7% 


9 


5 


13.9% 


10 


3 


8.3% 


11 


2 


5.6% 


12 


3 


8.3% 


15 




2.8% 


16 




2.8% 


18 




2.8% 


20 




2.8% 


24 




2.8% 



One way to apply these probabilities is to use them 
as a guide when you have a choice of points where 
you will place a blot. This chart shows you the most 
"dangerous" locations . . . and the safest: 



THE NUMBER OF WAYS 
A BLOT CAN BE HIT 
(Ignoring Intervening Blocked Points) 



Points From 

Attacking 

Man 

To Blot 


No. 

Of 

Ways 


% of 36 

Possible Rolls 

(Your Chance of 

Being Hit) 


1 


11 


30.6% 


2 


12 


33.3% 


3 


14 


38.9% 


4 


15 


41.7% 


5 


15 


41.7% 


6 


17 


47.2% 


7 


6 


16.7% 


8 


6 


16.7% 


9 


5 


13.9% 


10 


3 


8.3% 


11 


2 


5.6% 


12 


3 


8.3% 


15, 16, 18 
20 or 24 


1 each 


2.8% 


13,14, 17,19 
21 , 22 or 23 


NONE 


ZERO 



Finally you should be aware of your chances of 
re-entering your men from the bar. These chances 
are determined by the number of points in your 
opponent's home board that are blocked. Knowing 
these probabilities will be especially helpful when 
you have to decide whether or not to accept a double 
by your opponent. If you have more than one man to 
be re-entered your chances are considerably less, 
of course. 

NUMBER OF WAYS TO RE-ENTER ONE 
MAN FROM THE BAR ON ONE DICE ROLL 



No of Points 
Blocked 


Number 

of 

Ways 


% of 36 

Possible Rolls 

(Chance of 

Re-Entry) 


1 


35 


97.2% 


2 


32 


88.9% 


3 


27 


75.0% 


4 


20 


55.6% 


5 


11 


30.6% 



NUMBER OF WAYS TO RE-ENTER TWO 
MEN FROM THE BAR ON ONE DICE ROLL 



No of Points 
Blocked 


Number 

of 

Ways 


% of 36 

Possible Rolls 

(Chance of 

Re-Entry) 


1 


25 


69.4% 


2 


16 


44.4% 


3 


9 


25.0% 


4 


4 


11.1% 


5 


1 


2.8% 



H. GLOSSARY OF BACKGAMMON TERMS 

Backgammon - A triple score game, when the losing 
player has been unable to bear off any men, and 
still has at least one of his men in the winner's 
inner board (or on the bar) when the game ends. 

Bar - The space dividing both player's home and 
outer boards, and the location of men that have 
been hit. Men on the bar must be re-entered 
before any other man can be played, at an open 
point in the opponent's inner board. 

Bar Point - Each player's 7-point, the first point on 
his outer table, next to the bar. 

Bearing off - Generally, the last stage of the game — 
the process of removing men from the inner 
board according to rolls of the dice. To bear off, 
all men must be in the inner board; if bearing off 
has begun and a man is hit, this process cannot 
continue until that man has re-entered from the 
bar and been moved around and into the inner 
board again. When a die number is higher than 
the highest point on which the player has any 
men, he bears off from the highest number. 
Otherwise, a man may be borne off the point 
whose number is on either die. The first player 
to bear off all 15 men wins the game. 

Blot - A single man on any point. 

Board, inner -Sometimes called the "home board", 
the quarter of the game which is the destination 
of the men. In Computer Backgammon, your 
inner board is the lower left quarter; when 
played on the board, either side may be 
inner boards, by agreement of the players. 



V. 



J 



Board, outer - The other half of your side of the game. 

Cube - The device which keeps the current score 
value of the game. A game in which the cube is 
not used has a score value of one point; the cube 
displays the score value doubled each time it is 
used. 

Doubling - The process by which the score value of 
the game can be increased during play. Either 
player can offer to double the score value before 
rolling his dice, and this right alternates 
between the players. The opponent must accept 
the offer to double the score value, or forfeit the 
game and whatever score value was in effect 
before the offer. If he accepts the doubling offer, 
the game continues at the increased score value. 
The privilege of making the next offer to double 
then goes to the player who accepted the most 
recent offer. The score value reached by 
doubling is multiplied by 2 (if there is a 
gammon) or by 3 (if there is a backgammon). 

Enter - To return a man that has been knocked off, 
from the bar to an open point of opponent's 
inner board. 

Gammon - A double score game, when the losing 
player has been unable to bear off any men when 
the game ends. 

Hit - Landing on opponent's blot, sending his man to 
the bar (also called "knocking off"). A man on 
the bar is sometimes said to be "on the roof," 
or "in theair". 

Man, men - The most commonly used term for the 15 
pieces, discs, counters, or checkers used by 
each player. 



Point - Each of the 24 triangles on the whole game 
board; also a location on which a player has 2 or 
more men. When you have 2 or more men on a 
point, you are said to have "made the point". 

Prime - Adjacent points made by one player. A 6 
point ("major") prime is the ideal blocking 
situation, because the opponent cannot move 
past the prime. 



I. SUGGESTED BACKGAMMON READING 

For beginners . . . 

The Backgammon Book, Jacoby & Crawford, 
Viking Press, 1970 

The New York Times Book of Backgammon, 

Mary Zita Jacoby, Times Books, 1973 

Intermediate . . . 

Modern Backgammon Complete. Charles Goren, 
Doubleday, 1974 

Playboy Book of Backgammon, Lewis DeYong, 
Playboy Press, 1977 

Advanced . . . 

Backgammon, Paul Magriel, Times Books, 1976 

Paradoxes and Probabilities, Barclay Cooke, 
Random House, 1978 

Dynamic Cube Strategy, Horowitz & Roman, 
Advanced Backgammon Enterprises, 1980 



V. 



J. 90 DAY LIMITED WARRANTY 



Mattel Electronics warrants to the original consumer 
purchaser of any of its electronic games (including 
hand-held electronic games) that the product will be free 
of defects in material or workmanship for 90 days from the 
date of purchase. 

During this 90 Day Warranty Period, the game will either 
be repaired or it will be replaced with a reconditioned 
game of equivalent quality (at our option) without charge 
to the purchaser, when returned either to the dealer with 
proof of the date-of-purchase , or when returned prepaid 
and insured, with proof of the date-of-purchase, to: 

Mattel Electronics Repair Center 

5150 Rosecrans Avenue 

Hawthorne, California 90250. 

Units returned without proof of the date-of-purchase, or 
units returned after the 90 Day Warranty Period has 
expired, will be repaired or replaced (at our option) for a 
service charge of $10.00. Payment must be made by check 
or money order. This non-warranty service will only be 
available for one year from the date of purchase. All 
non-warranty units must be returned postage prepaid and 
insured to MATTEL ELECTRONICS REPAIR CENTER. 

This warranty gives you specific legal rights and you may 
also have other rights which vary from state to state. This 
warranty does not cover damage resulting from accident, 
unreasonable use, neglect, unauthorized service or other 
causes not arising out of defects in material or workmanship. 



www.handheldmuseum.com 



IN YOU NEED SERVICE FROM MATTEL 
ELECTRONICS REPAIR CENTER . . . 

It's available during and after the 90 Day Warranty Period. 

1. Pack the product carefully in its original box. If the box 
is not available, use a strong carton with plenty of 
newspaper or other padding. Enclose a brief note telling 
us the specific problem you are having with the unit, and 
your name and home address. Remove the batteries. 

2. Print this address on the box: 

MATTEL ELECTRONICS REPAIR CENTER 

5150 ROSECRANS AVENUE 

HAWTHORNE, CA 90250 

. . . and your return address. 

3. Send the package by insured parcel post. 

During the warranty period, enclose proof of purchase 
date. After warranty has expired, enclose check or money 
order for $10.00. 



IMPORTANT INFORMATION 

If game malfunctions this is the first sign of 
battery wear. A fresh battery should solve 
the problem. Use 9-volt high quality alkaline 
batteries. 



PROOF OF PURCHASE 



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PRODUCT NO. 1777-0920